Avoiding Assignment Abandonment

Many students need to learn that the word “due” has great importance in the academic world. When something is due, it is time to pass in. If students can master this simple three letter word, then their personal life will become much more manageable. If students can learn that an assignment is due, and if it is not done there are consequences, then they are more readily accepting that bills are due, rent/mortgage is due, and so on.

Here are a few suggestions to reinforce the concept of “due”:

Collect it: when the time is up, collect what the student has done. If they want to finish at home, take what they have done, and let them continue at home, but at least you will have in hand what they have done.
Call home and leave yourself a message.
Text yourself and leave yourself a message.
Email yourself and leave yourself a message.
Back up all computer work.

Tip from Robin Letendre

By |February 7th, 2017|ABE, Diploma, ESOL, HiSET, Organization|Comments Off on Avoiding Assignment Abandonment

The Three-Ring Binder

 

This is an organizational strategy that allows students to keep all of their materials in one place and accessible. If students can “buy into” this strategy, their academic life can become much more manageable.

To have a three-ring binder work best, students must have it divided into sections, use dividers with pockets, a plastic pouch for pencils, pens, and a calculator, and a calendar.

If a student does not understand the need for organization, then this strategy will not work.

Once the student sees that carrying around a three-ring binder with all of their important notes, papers, and assignments is actually helpful, they are more apt to use it.

Tip from Robin Letendre

By |January 30th, 2017|ABE, Diploma, ESOL, GED, Organization|Comments Off on The Three-Ring Binder

Five Minute Activities

Five Minute Activities: A Resource Book of Short Activities by Penny Ur and Andrew Wright, Cambridge University Press, 1992, is a little gem. These activities not only are good warm-ups, but also they contain ideas that could be expanded into full lessons by a creative teacher. Although some of the ideas are a little silly, others are truly inspired. In this thin volume, you’ll find 100 ideas that can really spice up your ESOL or even your ABE classroom. This is a great little volume to keep in your school book bag or in your desk at school. The activities are just right when you’ve finished the lesson early or when you’re waiting for some stragglers to get to class.

Tip from Susan Bubp

By |December 7th, 2016|ABE, ESOL|Comments Off on Five Minute Activities

Reading for specific information

This idea was thought of for ESL students learning to read in English but certainly can be used in any discipline, ABE, HiSET or AHS.

Many ESL students feel they need to know every word on the page in order to understand what they are reading. Learning to skim or scan is hard as they want to learn as much as they can and as many words as they can. It is important for them to learn that reading is for ideas and concepts and if they stop with each word that is new, they will learn words, but not comprehend what they are reading.

In small groups or pairs have student talk about the topic of what they will read. This could be the headlines of a newspaper story or the story title for example. On the board write a True/False statement from the story that you feel will give the students a good idea of the reading. Students will read the statement and then know what they need to focus on as they read. They can highlight, underline or write in a notebook the line(s) that support their answer.

Follow-up with class discussions and/or writing supporting the line they chose. It is important to have students know that they can be “right” as long as they support their answer. This can lead to a lot of conversation and discussion. In an ESL class if using a newspaper, it will also touch upon American Culture.

Tip from Christine Powers

By |October 25th, 2016|ABE, Adult High School, All Levels, HiSET, Reading|Comments Off on Reading for specific information

Editing the News

I give my class editing practice based on current stories from the news.  To prepare the lesson, I rewrite a story without capitals and end punctuation.  Also I include many spelling and homonym errors that I have noticed in the students’ compositions. Finally, I add a skill gleaned from the mini-lesson that precedes the whole activity. The mini-lesson can be on a grammar, punctuation or usage point. The skills in each page of editing practice are cumulative. Before we begin the editing practice, we talk about the content of the story, so the students have a chance to ask questions about the issue and discuss their opinions. After everyone finishes editing, we go over the paper using a document camera or an overhead projector, so everyone sees all the corrections. This activity makes editing a little more interesting since the content is current and the students’ schema is activated before they start. After we finish the editing practice, we read the entire story from the news. I find The Times in Plain English at http://www.thetimesinplainenglish.com/wp/ to be a great source of news stories for this activity.

Tip from Susan Bubp

By |November 20th, 2014|ABE, GED, Writing|Comments Off on Editing the News

Health Science Resource

Often students will ask me questions about medical issues involving themselves or their families. I share the website below to provide students with quick, basic information in a variety of formats. It’s easier for a student to brainstorm questions for their doctor once they have an understanding of the basic facts. It is also an excellent resource to use when developing lessons for ABE, GED and ESOL students.

www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/tutorial.html

Fantastic site of interactive health education tutorials
Animated graphics and easy to read language
Is read aloud and you can choose questions or no questions
A free site with no ads or registration

Tip from Denise Reddington 

By |September 30th, 2014|ABE, ESOL, GED, Science|Comments Off on Health Science Resource

Notability App

Notability is a great, inexpensive app for IPads. Although it’s designed for taking notes, it’s quite versatile. You can type on it, draw on it, and add photos or webpages. It has an amazing array of fonts, colors and outline features. It also has an audio feature that lets you record a lecture and take notes at the same time. For college transition students, this would be a fine tool to learn to use. But I’ve also found it to be a great tool for my beginning- level students.  Not only do they have the option of typing or writing on the screen with a stylus, but the word prediction feature helps with spelling. What the students seem to enjoy most is the record feature which enables them to listen to what they’ve written and hear the sound of their writing. It seems to give them more confidence and permission to take risks with their writing in a way that paper and pencil cannot.

Tip from Susan Bubp

By |September 16th, 2014|ABE, College Transitions, GED, Teacher Resources, Writing|Comments Off on Notability App

Name Writing

This is a fun way to learn names and practice writing or grammar throughout the year. Ask each student to write their name vertically and then to find a picture of something that begins with that letter and represents themselves. They could also draw if they chose. You can use this same idea, use a name, and then write a color, food, adjective, verb or noun that begins with each letter. Once the activity is mastered the students can focus on the skill of the task. Add a twist, use someone else’s name!
Extend this activity by having the students work with this vocabulary to write a paragraph. This can be done individually, in pairs or small groups.

Tip from Chris Powers

By |September 2nd, 2014|ABE, ESOL, Vocabulary, Writing|Comments Off on Name Writing

The Three-Ring Binder

This is an organizational strategy that allows students to keep all of their materials in one place and accessible. If students can “buy into” this strategy, their academic life can become much more manageable.

To have a three-ring binder work best, students must have it divided into sections, use dividers with pockets, a plastic pouch for pencils, pens, and a calculator, and a calendar.

If a student does not understand the need for organization, then this strategy will not work.

Once the student sees that carrying around a three-ring binder with all of their important notes, papers, and assignments is actually helpful, they are more apt to use it.

Tip from Robin Letendre

By |August 12th, 2014|ABE, Adult Learner Services, Diploma, ESOL, GED, Organization|Comments Off on The Three-Ring Binder

Reading Skills Web Quest

Go to the website listed below and answer the question on the sheet printed on the white board or on a paper.
1. Finding the Main Idea:
http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/h/main

Question: What historical figure were the passages about?
2. Drawing Conclusions:
http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/h/inferprac.cfm

Question: What contest did Taylor win?
3. Compare and Contrast:
http://Irs.ed.uiuc.edu/students/fwalters/compcontEx1a.html

http://Irs.ed.uiuc.edu/students/fwalters/compcontEx2a.html

What two things did you compare and contrast?_______________and______________

Tip from Elise Hood

(This idea was borrowed and somewhat changed from Barbara Harrington, Manchester Adult Learning Center)

By |November 19th, 2013|ABE, GED, Reading Comprehension|Comments Off on Reading Skills Web Quest