Avoiding Assignment Abandonment

Many students need to learn that the word “due” has great importance in the academic world. When something is due, it is time to pass in. If students can master this simple three letter word, then their personal life will become much more manageable. If students can learn that an assignment is due, and if it is not done there are consequences, then they are more readily accepting that bills are due, rent/mortgage is due, and so on.

Here are a few suggestions to reinforce the concept of “due”:

Collect it: when the time is up, collect what the student has done. If they want to finish at home, take what they have done, and let them continue at home, but at least you will have in hand what they have done.
Call home and leave yourself a message.
Text yourself and leave yourself a message.
Email yourself and leave yourself a message.
Back up all computer work.

Tip from Robin Letendre

By |February 7th, 2017|ABE, Diploma, ESOL, HiSET, Organization|Comments Off on Avoiding Assignment Abandonment

The Three-Ring Binder

 

This is an organizational strategy that allows students to keep all of their materials in one place and accessible. If students can “buy into” this strategy, their academic life can become much more manageable.

To have a three-ring binder work best, students must have it divided into sections, use dividers with pockets, a plastic pouch for pencils, pens, and a calculator, and a calendar.

If a student does not understand the need for organization, then this strategy will not work.

Once the student sees that carrying around a three-ring binder with all of their important notes, papers, and assignments is actually helpful, they are more apt to use it.

Tip from Robin Letendre

By |January 30th, 2017|ABE, Diploma, ESOL, GED, Organization|Comments Off on The Three-Ring Binder

The Three-Ring Binder

This is an organizational strategy that allows students to keep all of their materials in one place and accessible. If students can “buy into” this strategy, their academic life can become much more manageable.

To have a three-ring binder work best, students must have it divided into sections, use dividers with pockets, a plastic pouch for pencils, pens, and a calculator, and a calendar.

If a student does not understand the need for organization, then this strategy will not work.

Once the student sees that carrying around a three-ring binder with all of their important notes, papers, and assignments is actually helpful, they are more apt to use it.

Tip from Robin Letendre

By |August 12th, 2014|ABE, Adult Learner Services, Diploma, ESOL, GED, Organization|Comments Off on The Three-Ring Binder

A Tip for Assisting with Comprehension in Short Story Reading

Predicting and summarizing reading passages are difficult, but necessary, skills for the development of reading comprehension.  It helps to get students mentally involved and interactive with their reading.  One way to do this is to provide a template that students can use to aid this process when reading short stories.  This template can be adapted for other reading materials as well:
Prior to Reading

What does the title of the story convey to you?
What predictions can you make about the story based on the title?
Make a prediction about the theme or possible plot of the story based on the title.

While Reading

Who/what are the protagonist and antagonist?  How do you know this?
What is the setting (both time and place) of the story?  What points you in this direction?
What is the main problem that’s being faced in the story?
How do you think this problem will be resolved?  What clues can you identify to prove you are correct about this possible resolution?

After Reading

How was the problem/conflict dealt with in the end?
What was the involvement of the protagonist/antagonist?
Was your prediction about the theme correct?  Why/why not?  Explain in detail.
How did understanding the setting help you analyze the story?

Final Thoughts

What did you learn from your predictions?
What did you learn from this story?
How will you approach the next story you read?

Tip from Liz Feingold

By |May 20th, 2014|Diploma, Reading Comprehension|Comments Off on A Tip for Assisting with Comprehension in Short Story Reading

Read-pair-share

Read-pair-share is just like think-pair-share, but only students will read first, rather than think.  This is a collaborative strategy in which students can either read the required reading together or individually, but then the pairing has to occur.

This strategy works best if students have a set activity or project associated with their reading.  Reading and then pairing has to occur for a purpose.

Once the reading has occurred, the pairing is done with either one peer or a small group.  When the pairing is done, small grouping is established, and then the sharing takes place.  Again, the sharing has to have a purpose for this to be effective.

Tip from Robin Letendre

By |May 28th, 2013|Diploma, ESOL, GED|Comments Off on Read-pair-share

Post Card Connections

In this strategy, you will have to collect post cards to help students activate their prior knowledge.  If you cannot find post cards, feel free to “make” postcards using Google images and the like.

For example, if you are studying a unit on the monarchy of England, make or collect post cards from England.

When your class gathers, you will pass out the postcards and have students see if they know where these sites are.  In this strategy, it is best if students work in pairs or groups.

The teacher can determine the amount of time that will be spent on this pre-learning exercise.  The purpose of this strategy is for students to generate their back ground knowledge of the topic and begin to formulate questions about the topic of study.

Tip from Robin Letendre

By |February 11th, 2013|ABE, Diploma, ESOL, GED|Comments Off on Post Card Connections