The Three-Ring Binder

 

This is an organizational strategy that allows students to keep all of their materials in one place and accessible. If students can “buy into” this strategy, their academic life can become much more manageable.

To have a three-ring binder work best, students must have it divided into sections, use dividers with pockets, a plastic pouch for pencils, pens, and a calculator, and a calendar.

If a student does not understand the need for organization, then this strategy will not work.

Once the student sees that carrying around a three-ring binder with all of their important notes, papers, and assignments is actually helpful, they are more apt to use it.

Tip from Robin Letendre

By |January 30th, 2017|ABE, Diploma, ESOL, GED, Organization|Comments Off on The Three-Ring Binder

Editing the News

I give my class editing practice based on current stories from the news.  To prepare the lesson, I rewrite a story without capitals and end punctuation.  Also I include many spelling and homonym errors that I have noticed in the students’ compositions. Finally, I add a skill gleaned from the mini-lesson that precedes the whole activity. The mini-lesson can be on a grammar, punctuation or usage point. The skills in each page of editing practice are cumulative. Before we begin the editing practice, we talk about the content of the story, so the students have a chance to ask questions about the issue and discuss their opinions. After everyone finishes editing, we go over the paper using a document camera or an overhead projector, so everyone sees all the corrections. This activity makes editing a little more interesting since the content is current and the students’ schema is activated before they start. After we finish the editing practice, we read the entire story from the news. I find The Times in Plain English at http://www.thetimesinplainenglish.com/wp/ to be a great source of news stories for this activity.

Tip from Susan Bubp

By |November 20th, 2014|ABE, GED, Writing|Comments Off on Editing the News

Health Science Resource

Often students will ask me questions about medical issues involving themselves or their families. I share the website below to provide students with quick, basic information in a variety of formats. It’s easier for a student to brainstorm questions for their doctor once they have an understanding of the basic facts. It is also an excellent resource to use when developing lessons for ABE, GED and ESOL students.

www.nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/tutorial.html

Fantastic site of interactive health education tutorials
Animated graphics and easy to read language
Is read aloud and you can choose questions or no questions
A free site with no ads or registration

Tip from Denise Reddington 

By |September 30th, 2014|ABE, ESOL, GED, Science|Comments Off on Health Science Resource

Notability App

Notability is a great, inexpensive app for IPads. Although it’s designed for taking notes, it’s quite versatile. You can type on it, draw on it, and add photos or webpages. It has an amazing array of fonts, colors and outline features. It also has an audio feature that lets you record a lecture and take notes at the same time. For college transition students, this would be a fine tool to learn to use. But I’ve also found it to be a great tool for my beginning- level students.  Not only do they have the option of typing or writing on the screen with a stylus, but the word prediction feature helps with spelling. What the students seem to enjoy most is the record feature which enables them to listen to what they’ve written and hear the sound of their writing. It seems to give them more confidence and permission to take risks with their writing in a way that paper and pencil cannot.

Tip from Susan Bubp

By |September 16th, 2014|ABE, College Transitions, GED, Teacher Resources, Writing|Comments Off on Notability App

The Three-Ring Binder

This is an organizational strategy that allows students to keep all of their materials in one place and accessible. If students can “buy into” this strategy, their academic life can become much more manageable.

To have a three-ring binder work best, students must have it divided into sections, use dividers with pockets, a plastic pouch for pencils, pens, and a calculator, and a calendar.

If a student does not understand the need for organization, then this strategy will not work.

Once the student sees that carrying around a three-ring binder with all of their important notes, papers, and assignments is actually helpful, they are more apt to use it.

Tip from Robin Letendre

By |August 12th, 2014|ABE, Adult Learner Services, Diploma, ESOL, GED, Organization|Comments Off on The Three-Ring Binder

Reading Skills Web Quest

Go to the website listed below and answer the question on the sheet printed on the white board or on a paper.
1. Finding the Main Idea:
http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/h/main

Question: What historical figure were the passages about?
2. Drawing Conclusions:
http://www.studyzone.org/testprep/ela4/h/inferprac.cfm

Question: What contest did Taylor win?
3. Compare and Contrast:
http://Irs.ed.uiuc.edu/students/fwalters/compcontEx1a.html

http://Irs.ed.uiuc.edu/students/fwalters/compcontEx2a.html

What two things did you compare and contrast?_______________and______________

Tip from Elise Hood

(This idea was borrowed and somewhat changed from Barbara Harrington, Manchester Adult Learning Center)

By |November 19th, 2013|ABE, GED, Reading Comprehension|Comments Off on Reading Skills Web Quest

Teacher Approved and Student Endorsed Science Books

This school year I’m using some new multi-level science books that students are really enjoying and find valuable. These books focus on science vocabulary and informational readings. They are available at different levels and titles include Life Science, Earth Science and Physical Science. The name of the series is Passwords Science Vocabulary and they can be purchased at www.curriculumassociates.com.

For students ready to start practicing for their GED Test, Top 50 Science Skills for GED Success (Contemporary) is an excellent resource. The book includes 50 targeted lessons that cover the science skill strands found on the GED Test. This book provides excellent science background information and practice questions. It also makes for excellent oral reading, vocabulary and reading skill practice. This book is available at catalogs.mhhe.com/mhhe/home.do.

Tip from Denise Reddington

By |October 15th, 2013|GED, Science|Comments Off on Teacher Approved and Student Endorsed Science Books

Read-pair-share

Read-pair-share is just like think-pair-share, but only students will read first, rather than think.  This is a collaborative strategy in which students can either read the required reading together or individually, but then the pairing has to occur.

This strategy works best if students have a set activity or project associated with their reading.  Reading and then pairing has to occur for a purpose.

Once the reading has occurred, the pairing is done with either one peer or a small group.  When the pairing is done, small grouping is established, and then the sharing takes place.  Again, the sharing has to have a purpose for this to be effective.

Tip from Robin Letendre

By |May 28th, 2013|Diploma, ESOL, GED|Comments Off on Read-pair-share

Math Ice Breaker – “Let’s Figure it Out!”

Create a series of 15 squares on the floor close together.  Place a number 0 to 9 in each square and the five operation symbols in the other squares.

1.    Give a simple example:  1 + 2 = 3.  Ask five people in the group to step on the five squares to show this mathematical equation.  One person steps on the 1 square, one person steps on the 2 square, another on the plus sign, one on the equal sign, and the last one steps on the 3 square.

2.    Try one more practice like 17 – 9 = 8.

3.    Separate class into two teams.

4.    Call out an equation for team 1 and time them while they decide how to stand correctly on the squares.

5.    You can use this physical math activity for fun, to break up a long “sitting” lesson or as competition between two groups.

Tip from Elise Hood

By |April 23rd, 2013|ABE, GED, Math|Comments Off on Math Ice Breaker – “Let’s Figure it Out!”

Nutrition Label Math and Science Lessons

Nutritional labels can provide a wealth of information that can be used to create interesting math and science lessons. Once students really begin to look at and understand nutritional labeling they become more aware of the nutritional value of the foods they eat and give to their children. Encourage your students to bring the nutritional labels of their favorite foods to class and use these labels to answer such questions as:

What is the serving size?
How many servings are in the product?
How many calories are in one serving?
How many calories are in 3 servings?
If you ate the whole bag or drank the whole container, how many calories would you be consuming?
How many calories should a child/adult consume in one day?
What is the main ingredient of the product? How do you know?
How many grams of sugar are in the product?
Convert grams of sugar to teaspoons and measure it out so students can see how much sugar the product contains. There are about 4 grams of sugar in a teaspoon.

There are an unlimited number of questions that could be generated!

Check out the already made, printable nutritional worksheets available at fooducate.com. The easiest way to get to these worksheets is to google: fooducate fun nutritional worksheets.  Additional nutritional information to read and discuss in class can be found at choosemyplate.gov

Tip from Denise Reddington

By |April 9th, 2013|ABE, GED, Science|Comments Off on Nutrition Label Math and Science Lessons